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Jackie Gendel

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Jackie Gendel

Born 1973 in Houston, TX

Lives and works in Brooklyn, NY

“Much of her recent work makes contradictory use of two of modernity’s most common conventions of image production; she employs both serial repetition of form and the sequential image of narrative, using them simultaneously to unfold the implied relationship between narrative time and painterly process. This achieves a “Groundhog Day”-like effect in which a scene repeats albeit in slightly altered scenery, and increasingly nuanced but appreciable differences occur in the who, what, when, how, and ultimately, most importantly, “why”.” (source)

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Tilo Baumgärtel

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Tilo Baumgärtel

(1972 Leipzig / Leipzig, Saxony, Germany)

“Is painting not a battleground between industrial managed imagery and most private spheres and thoughts… ?”

“Tilo Baumgärtel’s paintings have an air of fairytale about them. Suspended in space and time, his strange scenes unfold with wondrous uncertainty, suggesting fragmented dreamy narratives of his own invention. In The Fencing Lesson, Baumgärtel composes his painting with surreal rigidity. His static figures, like statues, are frozen in the estranged aura of the room. Baumgärtel uses his muted palette to extend the anomalistic quality of space; the planar walls and furniture seem transfixed, yet weightless in peculiar light. Picturing quirky innocence, Baumgärtel’s painting is unsettling in both its inertia and expectant violence.” (source)

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Patrick Michael Fitzgerald

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From an interview at Studio Critical blog:

“My process has become very organic; reworking things, interweaving things… paintings can have their origins in the history of my own work or the wider history of art. Some small aspect or detail can be enough. A memory of something or even certain sensations. I also use my immediate surroundings and day-to-day life as a source. For me this is important, it’s a way of transforming it into something else. The everyday can have a blind weight to it; the challenge is how to open it up, break it open even. The marvellous is always close at hand and often overlooked. There is also an element of recycling; discarded paintings or studio debris can be incorporated into a work, something from nothing, a kind of radical humility.”

“One could consider each painting as a problem to be resolved but I shy away from this idea. A painting should be a lived thing, it is lived through in its making and in the viewing, as such it will often contain certain failures or inherent problems. It is very often the case that the unresolved has a lot of truth in it. For me a painting is an entity that should not depend on a fixed one-dimensional face to the world. It is an accumulation of evidence which reflects the life of its own making and the daily life that has gone into it.”

“The only real things that need resolving are those that most people have…life things, practical things. In my case, it’s creating a balance, which enables me to work, finding time and a certain tranquil state of mind. This is not always easy to achieve.”

(read the rest of the interview here!)

See more paintings here!

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Tony Urquhart

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I wonder if anyone has heard of the Canadian painter Tony Urquhart? Yesterday he gave a short talk on his work at Conron Hall on UWO campus. For those of you who are working within the space of landscape, his work may be of interest to you.

From the artist’s website:

“Tony Urquhart was born in 1934 in Niagara Falls, Ontario. In the late 1950s and early 1960s he was recognized as one of Canada’s pioneering abstract artists, having been one of the painters associated with The Isaacs Gallery in Toronto, and later with The Heart of London group (which included Jack Chambers, Greg Curnoe, and Murray Favro.)”

“Between 1954 and 1958 he attended the Albright Art School in Buffalo. In 1960 he became the first artist-in-residence at the University of Western Ontario, where he subsequently started his teaching career. In 1972 he became a full-time professor of Fine Arts at the University of Waterloo and remained on the faculty for three decades (living with his family in the nearby town of Wellesley, Ontario.)”

“In 1958 he embarked on the first of many annual trips to Europe, where he was attracted to what he called the ‘otherness’ of the visual experience he encountered there. He was particularly drawn to the landscape, architecture and pilgrimage sites (such as Lourdes and Vimy Ridge in France). He has made a study of 19th and 20th century French cemeteries from Pere La Chaise in Paris to the hundreds of small country graveyards outside of humble villages throughout France. He has a collection of over 800 120mm slides of sites and cemetery artifacts (wreaths, wrought iron objects, etc) which he often uses as reference for his drawings, paintings and box sculptures.”

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Questions for Bob Nickas essay

Our reading discussion for the Bob Nickas text ‘The Persistence of Abstraction’ is happening January 29th. Here are some questions I want you to try to answer when reading this text – start earlier rather than later, as it will probably take a few re-readings to consider all of these questions.

What do you think about the idea that Kazimir Malevich’s black square and red square are “just as ‘real’ as a representational picture”?

What does Nickas mean by the “shared reality of all painted pictures”?

Nickas says “the kinds of hybridized, self-aware, and conceptual paintings we routinely encounter today demand to be discussed on their own terms.” How do you discuss a painting on its own terms?

How does a painting “engage the act of painting”? How do you have an “active engagement with painting”?

What did Ad Reinhardt mean when he wrote “the content is not in a subject matter or story, but in the actual painting activity”?

What does Nickas mean by “abstraction understood in lowercase”?

Is it possible today to make a painting based upon the ” ‘radical’ gesture of negation” in Malevich’s paintings?

How would you answer Nickas’s question: “which aspects of the everyday compel an artist to make an abstract painting rather than a work of any other kind?”

What does Nickas say abstraction demands of the viewer? 

What does Nickas mean by saying all abstraction today is “found”? What does this mean in terms of authorship?

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Richard Tuttle

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Some of you may already be familiar with Richard Tuttle’s work, but I’d like to point out how influential his work has been (particularly to many of the painters featured on this blog). Take a close look at how material, color, and construction come together in these works.

From the Art21 page on Tuttle:

“Richard Tuttle was born in Rahway, New Jersey, in 1941, and lives and works in New Mexico and New York. He received a BA from Trinity College, Hartford. Although most of Tuttle’s prolific artistic output since the beginning of his career in the 1960s has taken the form of three-dimensional objects, he commonly refers to his work as drawing rather than sculpture, emphasizing the diminutive scale and idea-based nature of his practice. He subverts the conventions of Modernist sculptural practice—defined by grand, heroic gestures; monumental scale; and the “macho” materials of steel, marble, and bronze—and instead creates small, eccentrically playful objects in decidedly humble, even “pathetic” materials such as paper, rope, string, cloth, wire, twigs, cardboard, bubble wrap, nails, Styrofoam, and plywood. Tuttle also manipulates the space in which his objects exist, placing them unnaturally high or oddly low on a wall—forcing viewers to reconsider and renegotiate the white-cube gallery space in relation to their own bodies. Tuttle uses directed light and shadow to further define his objects and their space. Influences on his work include calligraphy (he has a strong interest in the intrinsic power of line), poetry, and language. A lover of books and printed matter, Tuttle has created artist’s books, collaborated on the design of exhibition catalogues, and is a consummate printmaker. Richard Tuttle received a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship and the Skowhegan Medal for Sculpture. He has had one-person exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; Kunsthaus Zug, Switzerland; Centro Galego de Arte Contemporánea, Santiago de Compostela; and Museu Fundação Serralves, Porto. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art organized a 2005 Tuttle retrospective.”

More images: http://www.contemporaryartdaily.com/2012/11/richard-tuttle-mei-mei-berssenbrugge-at-kunstverein-munchen/

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Eli Bornowsky

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This past Thursday I was able to visit G Gallery in Toronto, which is currently showing new work by Eli Bornowsky. Some of you who are exploring sculptural aspects in your work may be interested in Bornowsky’s practice. The exhibition is on until March 2nd.

Eli Bornowsky at G Gallery:

“These are the first works I have accomplished that actually empty the viewers mind. Acknowledging that seeing can be separate from the analytic, deductive mind is difficult, but actually experiencing it is remarkable. Intuition has its own way of connecting us to number, geometry, love and reality.”

“Bornowsky creates eccentric abstract paintings. Each body of work builds on the ideas and experiences of the previous. His trajectory is one of careful, intuitive reinvention; an evolving formal language arrived at through the experience of making. This exhibition will present a collection of discrete relief assemblages. Each shaped surface is mounted with wooden spheres, painted and drawn with gouache and marker. The works take unusual cues from a diverse art historical repertoire. For Bornowsky “there is something to be gleaned in almost every Art.” In this case he cites artists like Guston and Tuttle, but also renaissance painting, Islamic rugs, tantric art, free Jazz and electronic music. Bornowsky will also present a site specific collection of artist “frames” made specifically for this installation.”

Born in Alberta Canada, Eli Bornowsky received his BFA in Visual Arts from the Emily Carr Institute in Vancouver (2005) and is an MFA candidate at Bard College, New York. In 2007 his paintings were shown in the group exhibition Gasoline Rainbows at the Contemporary Art Gallery and he began working with the Blanket Gallery with solo exhibitions in 2007, 2008 and 2011. In 2009 his work was included in the exhibition Enacting Abstraction at the Vancouver Art Gallery and in 2010 he exhibited Walking Square Cylinder Plane, a solo exhibition at the Western Front. His critical texts have appeared in Fillip Review, C Magazine, Pyramid Power and artist catalogues. The label Rundownsun has released a limited edition cassette of his experimental audio projects. He has curated exhibitions for the Or Gallery including, Making Real (2008), After Finitude (2012), and the ongoing Clamour and Toll, a series of experimental music and performance. He currently resides in Vancouver.

http://www.elibornowsky.com/

 

 

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Alex Harding

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“Alexis Harding uses the reaction of gloss paint poured over oil paint to create paintings over a period of up to three months, in which abstract grids, lines and arrows appear to be dramatically hanging off and sliding away from their canvas supports.”

From an interview:

Your work seems to be as much about time and movement as abstraction…
‘I’m pleased that you’ve said that. Although I use modernist devices like the grid, and more recently lines and arrows, I’ve always tried to avoid cold descriptions of the paintings such as “process-driven abstraction”. They are more about imbuing paint with behaviours such as leaving or escaping. And there is a visible durational element in that you can see how the paint surface has moved and wrinkled, either through gravity or by myself physically massaging and squeezing it.’

What about the series of 120 small works in your new exhibition?
‘They are all unseen works made during the last six years on the cardboard backs of an old catalogue of mine. They’ve been given the title “Bi-product Depositories” because they began initially as a means of using unwanted paint and other materials created during the painting process.

So are they now a body of work in their own right?
‘I’m sure that they will feed back into the main paintings but they do have their own recurring motifs such as tower blocks and heads, which create a type of speedy, schematic illusionism. Now I’m thinking that “Bi-product Depositories” may not be quite the right title. Perhaps they are “Wayward Accomplices”.’

(source)

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Alex Harding

(born 1973 London, UK)

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Dickson Bou and Thomas Chisholm at Forest City Gallery this Friday!

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Bracket(ed) – Dickson Bou and Thomas Chisholm

Friday, January 11, 2013 – Friday, February 15, 2013
7:00- 10:00 PM
Forest City Gallery proudly announces our next exhibition:

Bracket(ed), a collaborative exhibition featuring works by Dickson Bou and Thomas Chisholm.

Duration: January 11th to February 15th, 2013.

Opening Reception: Friday, January 11th, 2013 from 7-10 PM.

Artist Talk: Saturday, January 12th from 1:00 PM- 2:00 PM

Brain Trust (Kirkpatrick and Thompson) will be playing at Hot Dog Musique and Cinema at 7:00 PM.

Forest City presents a collaborative exhibition by artists Dickson Bou and Thomas Chisholm, Bracket(ed) on January 11 through February 15th, 2013. This show will concentrate on the spatial and temporal interplay between their work and explore the complexity of viewership within the realm of space-time objectivity.

Dickson Bou

EDUCATION
University of Victoria British Columbia. 2011
University of Western Ontario. BFA. 2009
University of Western Ontario. BSc. 2007

Thomas Chisholm

Education
University of Victoria, MFA, 2010
NSCAD, Halifax, Nova Scotia, BFA, Minor in Art History, 2008

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Max Brand

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“Max Brand (German, b. 1982) paints with a wide variety of media including sidewalk chalk, crayon, pencil, marker, spray paint, ballpoint pen, chlorine bleach, and oil and acrylic paints. His chaotic lines, lush washes, and indeterminate stains create thickets of representational noise that are as exuberant as they are deceptively scatterbrained. The artist’s line quality, often similar to a doodle or illustration, is both idle and obsessive, serving for Brand as the raw material of the mind, as a transcription of the automatic or subconscious. Taken as a whole, his visions—drawn as much from cinema, ceramics, comic books, Japanese anime, and graphic design as from painting itself—hint at codes or constellations of thought.” (source)

More images here and here!